The Mysterious World of Twitter: Part Three

This post is the third in a three-part series exploring the role of Twitter in education today. The focus of this post is literacy instruction using Twitter.

By Leslie Davison and Hollyanna Bates

Some of you might be wondering when we will stop talking about Twitter.

Yes, we have found it an invaluable tool for professional development and want the world to know its possibilities. Two weeks ago we shared about Twitter as a resource to grow and develop a Personal Learning Network. Last week Dr. Mary Howard helped us understand why we might want to venture into Twitter Chats for a unique conversation on a literacy-related topic. Closing in the series, this week we delve into ways that Twitter could benefit classroom literacy instruction.

First we start with a warning: technology is not the answer. We will be the first to advocate that children still have a chance to compose on paper, write thank you notes and letters to classmates or community members and spend most of their time reading the the most beautiful books and stories we can find. Additionally, using Twitter in the classroom can bring new and innovative connections for you and your students. Below we have identified five practices that enhance learning when infused into an already strong literacy culture.

Read Aloud Hashtags

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When classrooms of children listen to a novel read out loud, by an enthralled and expert reader, the community lives the story of the characters together. All day long there are references to the lives they are living alongside. During certain sections of the text, there is much anticipation as certain events further unravel. Audible moans can be heard when read aloud finishes as the group is left hanging, each child sharing in the delight of a powerful piece of literature and the impact it leaves. Following a hashtag related to the read aloud may offer insight into how others perceive the characters and plot or events.
The tweet to the right is from a class reading #theoneandonlyivaScreen Shot 2017-11-19 at 3.13.55 PMn. The photo is of their staged protest to protect animal rights. The teacher, Elizabeth Spindler, @lizspindler6, tweeted the picture using book’s hashtag. During the school year, students read the tweets about the novels they have read and continue being invested in the story, watching how others interact with the text. Other resources which may be found using a book hashtag are: artistic interpretations of text, literacy responses via digital tools, book trailers, letters to and from the author, bulletin boards, clips of professional theater performances and more. Sharing these examples with students can support the culture of literacy and generate ideas and excitement for future experiences.

Twitter book reviews

This brand of book reviews forces the student to capture the essence of the text in 280 characters (previously the character limit was 140). @GwynethJones made this display showcasing the student writing. Jones sharesthe process for teaching students how to write these reviews here.

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Book character tweets

Students write a tweet from the perspective of a character in a book they are reading. While taking on a character is not innovative, using Twitter to share this message broadens the audience. The goal is that students write and respond to others in their class and beyond. Motivation and authenticity improve when student voices are public and they receive likes, retweets or replies to their writing.

 Student news

Several major news organizations provide special programming designed for student readers. When following a news outlet, students see a variety of articles about pertinent topics. Some teachers identify one student to read the news of the day and share highlights with the class. Choice, voice, exposure to nonfiction text and current events are all benefits of this implementing this practice. We recommend: @kidspress   @thewhitehouse @bbcnewsround @CNNStudents @NGKids

Students write tweets

One student is assigned to be the tweeter of the day. They choose the most interesting experience of the day and with support, send the tweet out to the universe. Ipads or even the teacher’s phone can provide a photo or video of this experience. Even kindergarteners can learn to tweet using the word wall and known words. Using a hashtag like #firstgradeBHE would signify that while the tweets are coming from the teacher’s account, the students in first grade at Big Horn Elementary are the writers of the tweets. Community members, parents and other followers can provide a positive response to the student writing through retweets, likes, and replies.

 Pro Tips:

  • You will want to preview any hashtag and be wary of book titles that may have other meanings not appropriate to children (#Holes).
  • If you tweet about a book, try to mention the author or publisher. You may get something in return.
  • Be sure to inform yourself about using technology in your district, especially when using student names on social media.
  • Tweet Deck is a method of using Twitter which helps organize hashtags so that students can see multiple conversations at one time.

Leslie Davison is a Google Certified Innovator who presents around the country with the EdTechTeam. She coordinates the Dual Immersion program in Summit School District in Frisco, Colorado. Follow her on Twitter @lesliedavison

Hollyanna Bates is a Past President of CCIRA and a Reading Recovery Teacher Leader/Literacy Coordinator in Summit School District in Frisco, Colorado.  Follow her on Twitter @hollyannabates

Author: CCIRAblog

Check out CCIRA's website today at ccira.org

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